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The Labors of Hercules - Labor IV - Part 1
Meaning of the Story

Eurystheus, therefore, sent Hercules to capture the golden horned Keryneian doe or hind. The word "hind" comes from an old Gothic word, meaning "that which must be seized", in other words, that which is elusive and difficult to secure. This doe was sacred to Artemis, the goddess of the moon; but Diana, the huntress of the heavens, the daughter of the sun, also claimed it and there was a quarrel as to ownership. Hercules accepted the charge of Eurystheus and set out to capture the gentle hind. He was a whole year hunting it, going from one forest to another, just catching sight of it and then again losing [84] it. Month after month went by, and he never could catch and hold it. Success at last crowned his efforts and he seized the doe, flung it over his shoulder, "held it close to his heart", and carried it to the sacred temple at Mykenae, where he laid it down before the altar, in the holy place. Then he stood back, pleased with his success.
This is one of the shortest of the stories but though we are told very little, this labor, when considered thoughtfully, is one of profound and outstanding interest and the lesson it holds is of deep import. There is no success for the aspirant until he has transmuted instinct into intuition, nor is there right use of the intellect until the intuition is brought into play, interpreting and extending the intellect and bringing realization. Then instinct is subordinated to both. [85]

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